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Not at all, US coal plants account for 1% of the global pool, most of that is deposited outside of the US. Fact Sheet - ...

  1. #16
    Nearly 100% Pure Carbon thecoalman's Avatar
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    Not at all, US coal plants account for 1% of the global pool, most of that is deposited outside of the US.
    Fact Sheet - Final Rule | Clean Air Mercury Rule | US EPA

    Mercury Emissions: A Global Problem

    * Mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants comes from mercury in coal, which is released when the coal is burned. While coal-fired power plants are the largest remaining source of human-generated mercury emissions in the United States, they contribute very little to the global mercury pool. Recent estimates of annual total global mercury emissions from all sources -- both natural and human-generated -- range from roughly 4,400 to 7,500 tons per year. Human-caused U.S. mercury emissions are estimated to account for roughly 3 percent of the global total, and U.S. coal-fired power plants are estimated to account for only about 1 percent.

    * EPA has conducted extensive analyses on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants and subsequent regional patterns of deposition to U.S. waters. Those analyses conclude that regional transport of mercury emission from coal-fired power plants in the U.S. is responsible for very little of the mercury in U.S. waters. That small contribution will be significantly reduced after EPA’s Clean Air Interstate Rule and Clean Air Mercury Rule are implemented.

    o U.S. coal-fired power plants emit mercury in three different forms: oxidized mercury (likely to deposit within the U.S.); elemental mercury, which travels hundreds and thousands of miles before depositing to land and water; and mercury that is in particulate form.

    o Because mercury can be transported thousands of miles in the atmosphere, and because many types of fish are caught and sold globally, effective exposure reduction will require reductions in global emissions

    Now if you want to talk about making a dent in mercury emissions you need to get China onboard, Asian countries account for 50% of the global pool and most of that comes from Chian. The proposals for reductions in mercury emissions here in the US that will cost consumers tens of billions of dollars is just feel good legislation that will have a negligible benefit. It could even cause more emissions as more manufacturing goes overseas because of increased cost for power.

    Getting back to the CFL's and I'm going from memory here but each one contains about .2mg of mercury, the additional power the same incandescent uses produces something like .5mg so you have net loss of about .3mg and again that is assuming every bulb is broken which is just a bit unrealistic. Most of it will be contained in a landfill even if they are broken. The only thing that might be debatable is how much is released to produce them.
    Last edited by thecoalman; 12-06-2011 at 03:27 AM.

  2. #17
    Ron
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    Not the only thing that's debatable.

    I have had MANY of these malfunction over the years. As for the ones that haven't malfunctioned... 10,000 hours? Hah! Bulloney. Maybe in some theoretical test lab somewhere. I think I've had exactly 1 that has lasted anywhere near that, and it's on 24 hours a day. Any that are cycled die way earlier than that. I've had 3 fail in my basement, where I have two bare fixtures and where I visit only a few times per year! I don't think they like hanging around unused in cool dark dank places. The bulbs they replaced had been there since I bought the place, so maybe 18 years before they failed, and one was failure by catastrophic headbump.

    In my experience.

    In addition, since my home is heated entirely by resistance electric there is no savings at all by reducing "inefficient" lighting during heating season. I'm sure that heating system use reduction was not taken into account by the "powers that be" while I wonder if A/C load reduction was taken into account.

    I have to use higher "equivalent lumen" bulbs in some places due to the warmup factor, unless I want to wait 5 minutes letting the lights warm up before I start to work... or take a shower. I had to install an extra fixture in my garage for this reason. All of these drastically reduce the pie-in-the-sky savings touted by the greenies.

    They don't fit in my R20 recessed cans in my kitchen, so I guess I'll have to open up a ceiling to install new cans. I wonder what the energy cost for the new cans is, and for the drywall, and the workers transportation to my house to do the work.

    Finally I dislike florescent lighting, especially when it starts to flicker. I had an acquaintance who was especially sensitive to florescent lighting, he saw flicker constantly even when most people did not. Some of the bulbs hum like a son-of-a-gun too.
    Last edited by Ron; 12-06-2011 at 04:01 AM.
    Good luck

  3. #18
    Loyal Client the_ancient's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
    Having said that I don't need big brother telling what type of lighting to use. I've used CFL's for at least 5 years now because they cost less in the long run. Where I don't use them is outside because I live in a cold weather climate for the winter, by the time they heat up it's usually time to turn the damn light off.
    Shhhhh, CFL are just a good in every situation, They work fine in 3 ways, dimmers, recessed lights, outside, every place a real light bulb can go..... They do not give people headaches, make things worse for people with migraines, or have the tendency to cause seizures in people with epilepsy, They are Grand.....

    //That was sarcasm in case anyone is dense

    This bann is simply a GE Payoff,
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  4. #19
    Registered User Bell thorpe's Avatar
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    Mercury evaporates very slowly. It can be a real danger in the house, especially to toddlers. And its vapour, if breathed in close quarters is also dangerous.

  5. #20
    Ron
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    I do like my LED bulbs though.

    I just put in the first 15 of 60 I bought (or more accurately the ones that the ratepayers of Connecticut Power and Light bought for me).

    Instant on and bight as heck, 9.5 watts and NO MERCURY, no "hazardous waste" collection issues that we know about yet (my town is now paying to have CFLs disposed of in Hazardous Waste landfills. Yay team!). We'll see if they last.
    Good luck

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